History versus casuistry
Read Online
Share

History versus casuistry evidence of the Ramajanmabhoomi Mandir presented by the Vishva Hindu Parishad to the Government of India in December-January 1990-91. by

  • 330 Want to read
  • ·
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Voice of India in New Delhi .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Ayodhya (Faizabad, India),
  • India,
  • Faizabad.

Subjects:

  • Babari Masjid (Faizabad, India) -- History.,
  • Communalism -- India -- Faizabad.,
  • Hindus -- India -- Faizabad.,
  • Muslims -- India -- Faizabad.,
  • Ayodhya (Faizabad, India) -- Politics and government.

Book details:

Edition Notes

ContributionsViśva Hindū Parishad.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDS486.A98 H57 1991
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 144 p. ;
Number of Pages144
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1685533M
LC Control Number91907300

Download History versus casuistry

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

If asked to provide two bookends to a theology/philosophy library, my choices would be David Tracy's Blessed Rage for Order and this book, The Abuse of Casuistry. The former provides contemporaneous structure and language to the general propositions of the subject, this book obtains practical meaning (meaningfulness)from the individual by: of results for Books: "casuistry" Skip to main search results Amazon Prime. Eligible for Free Shipping. A Study in the History of Casuistry. by Emily Corran. Kindle $ $ 69 $ $ Available instantly. Hardcover $ $ 76 $ $   About the Book. In this engaging study, the authors put casuistry into its historical context, tracing the origin of moral reasoning in antiquity, its peak during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, and its subsequent fall into disrepute from the mid-seventeenth century. Cicero ( BC) bequeathed to history the first set of clearly formulated moral "cases." In his De Officiis are described a number of examples in which individuals are perplexed by a conflict of moral duty. This was the first "case book" that related a number of these dilemmas in .

In this engaging study, the authors put casuistry into its historical context, tracing the origin of moral reasoning in antiquity, its peak during the sixteenth and early seventeenth century, and its subsequent fall into disrepute from the mid-seventeenth century.5/5(1). A Brief History of Casuistry. Cicero and the Nature of Classical Rhetoric. De Officiis. In "On Duty" the Roman Marcus Cicero ( - 43 BC) wrote the first 'case book' on situations where 'conflicts of duty' appear to arise. We need to consider "what is most needful in each individual case," he wrote, and that "different circumstances should be. History. Greek and Roman philosophers, Jewish rabbis, Christian preachers and teachers, and Islamic jurists (see also Sharīʿah) are among those who have used casuistry to solve real-life moral puzzles. The Roman orator and philosopher Cicero wrote the first known “case book” on . In the balance of this post, I want to focus on another set of flaws in Season 4 of Revisionist History. Episode 5 begins a three-part mini-series on casuistry--a method of moral reasoning closely associated with the Jesuits. The word casuistry is sometimes used as a synonym for sophistry or fallacious reasoning, but Gladwell uses it in its.

Casuistry, the practice of resolving moral problems by applying a logical framework, has had a much larger historical presence before and since it was given a name in the Renaissance. The contributors to this volume examine a series of case studies to explain how different cultures and religions, past and present, have wrestled with morality's exceptions and margins and the norms with which. Casuistry attempts this through a three-step process. First, a contextually vibrant case description is begun that highlights the aspects of the moral dilemma. Second, the case is categorized and compared to past paradigm cases through analogical reasoning to classify the similarities and dissimilarities of the particular cases versus its.   The latest book by the author of Outliers and The Tipping Point looks at miscommunication throughout history — and finds it's really hard to know whom to believe.   Quite apart from the book's more normative message, the authors' "samples" of casuistical reasoning as applied to the problems of usury, equivocation, and responding to insults-in addition to their account of Pascal's devastating but (they argue) misguided attack on casuistry in the Provincial Letters--would alone be worth the price of admission.